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Equality Mainstreaming and Outcomes

West Lothian Integration Joint Board - Equality Mainstreaming and Outcomes

Consultation on Draft Equality Outcomes 2021 - 2025

The West Lothian Integration Joint Board (IJB) is setting its equality outcomes for the next four years as is its duty under the Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties) (Scotland) Regulations 2012.

This consultation seeks your views on draft equality outcomes developed by the IJB.

Equality outcomes are results intended to achieve specific and identifiable improvements in the lives of those who are most disadvantaged and to narrow or remove the biggest inequalities experienced by particular groups who have a protected characteristic. The Equality Act 2010 defines these characteristics as:

  • age
  • disability
  • gender reassignment
  • marriage and civil partnership
  • pregnancy and maternity
  • race
  • religion or belief
  • sex
  • sexual orientation

In drafting these equality outcomes, we looked at the vast amount of work already done to develop the IJB's Strategic Plan and commissioning plans. Reducing inequalities, in particular, health inequalities, is central to the work of the IJB and we have already engaged extensively with our stakeholders to develop commissioning plans for older people's services, physical disability, learning disability and alcohol and drug services.

A wide range of engagement activities took place from August through to mid November 2019 across all four plans to seek views directly from service users, carers and families, staff, service providers and other stakeholders. Engagement activity was tailored to each care group and involved commissioning leads attending network groups, face to face meetings and workshops. Two public engagements events were held covering all the commissioning plans. Information about the public events was circulated widely within networks, posted on West Lothian Council's social media pages and shared with service providers, community centres, contacts and projects throughout West Lothian. Consultation also took place with all representatives of the IJB's Strategic Planning Group.

These draft equality outcomes are informed by that engagement work and are directly aligned to our Communication and Engagement Strategy and to the commissioning plans for older people's services, physical disability and learning disability.

This approach will ensure that the actions required to fulfil our equality outcomes are prioritised as part of the established planning and commissioning process, and progress will be closely monitored over the next four years.

We believe these three outcomes will help some of the most disadvantaged of those we plan and commission services for and will contribute to the IJB's vision:

"To increase wellbeing and reduce health inequalities across all communities in West Lothian"

To take part in the consultation, please click here, to answer a few questions about the draft equality outcomes below.

This survey is open until Sunday 4th April 2021.

If you require information in any other format, a different language, or you require assistance to take part in the consultation, please contact the IJB Project Officer at lorna.kemp@westlothian.gov.uk. 

1.   People with protected characteristics are directly able to influence how the IJB plans and commissions services

Why is this an important?

There are a number of ways in which some groups with protected characteristics are disadvantaged when it comes to being able to engage with the IJB, whether that is through participation in meetings or being able to take part in a consultation.

People with a disability may require information in a different format, or may require support from others to understand IJB reports, consultations and other communications, whereas people from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities may speak English as a second language or not at all.

Digital exclusion is an increasingly prominent issue as we become a more digital society, with an overlap between groups who are more likely to be digitally excluded and the most vulnerable members of our society.  Older people in particular are more likely to have limited digital literacy at a time when they are increasingly isolated due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

What can we do?

  • Give people a choice in how they engage with us by using a wide range of methods as described in our Communication and Engagement Strategy to ensure that no one is disadvantaged by disability, access to the internet or difficulties with literacy.
  • Alternative formats should be proactively offered on all communications, for example, easy-read, Braille, different languages
  • Develop a Digital Strategy for the IJB that considers the needs of those with protected characteristics, e.g. older people, people with disabilities, and those whose first language is not English.
  • Continue to implement our Communication and Engagement Strategy which includes a range of actions to better engage with our stakeholders

How will we know we have achieved this outcome?

  • Progress against the Communication and Engagement Strategy is monitored and reported to the IJB on an annual basis.
  • The Digital Strategy will be approved by the IJB once it is developed and then progress will be reported at regular intervals.
  • We will monitor the demographic of those who engage with us and record when we receive requests for information in different formats.

 

2.   Adults with a disability are supported and empowered to access their community safely

Why is this important?

West Lothian IJB supports the direction set out in 'A Fairer Scotland for Disabled People' (2016), and other key strategies and action plans by the Scottish Government to ensure that people living with disabilities can live independently and well wherever possible. This should include being able to enjoy living in your local community and have choices in how you spend your time, without being disproportionately disadvantaged by disability.

We know that people with disabilities still experience barriers to services and this can be quite isolating. Feedback from our engagement activities was that people with disabilities would like to be able to live in their own community, have choices of meaningful and sustainable day activities including peer support and social activities

Housing is an essential of independent living, yet many people with a disability live in homes that do not meet their requirements (Equality and Human Rights Commission, 2018). There are an increasing number of people in West Lothian living with complex care needs and it is important that accommodation meeting these needs is available.

What can we do?

  • Our commissioning plans for Physical Disability and Learning Disability set out a range of actions to improve access to the wider community and to information they need, when they need it and in an appropriate format
  • Work with colleagues in Housing to ensure enough new build homes are adaptable to the needs of those with physical disabilities
  • Continue to develop a range of 'core' housing models to enable people with learning disability to live within local communities

How will we know we have achieved this outcome?

  • Progress against the commissioning plans is monitored closely by individual planning and commissioning boards for each care group. The IJB's Strategic Planning Group has oversight of all of the plans and a 6 monthly progress report is made to the IJB
  • There will be sufficient housing stock to meet the needs of people with disabilities
  • People requiring adaptations in their home will have work carried out in a reasonable timescale
  • People with complex care needs will not be delayed in hospital due to a shortage of suitable accommodation
  • Progress against the commissioning plans is monitored closely by individual planning and commissioning boards for each care group. The IJB's Strategic Planning Group has oversight of all of the plans and a 6 monthly progress report is made to the IJB
  • National Indicator 15 - Proportion of last 6 months of life spent at home or in a community setting
  • National Indicator 16 - Falls rate per 1,000 population aged 65+

 

3.   Older People are supported and empowered to keep well and live in a homely setting for as long as possible

Why is this important?

People are living longer but are also living longer in ill health. Over the period 2016 to 2041, West Lothian's population of over 75s will have increased by 46% compared to the national average of 27%.  More older people are living in the community with one or more chronic illness and the growth in longer term conditions continues to rise.

Older people are already at higher risk of social isolation and loneliness, which in turn can increase the risk of health problems and poor ageing outcomes. This is a particular concern for those living alone in with poor mobility, or those are shielding during the Covid-19 pandemic, particularly if they lack a support system of friends and/or relatives.

Falls in the elderly are common and associated with major morbidity and mortality. Falls cause injuries, fractures, loss of confidence and independence, depression and death. Recurrent falls and fear of falling are the most common reasons for an older person to require nursing home care.

Planning future services will need to focus on the preventative and proactive management of these conditions to prevent further deterioration and to ensure people living longer can do so in good health as far as is possible at home or in a homely setting.

What can we do?

Through our Older People's Services Commissioning Plan:

  • Further develop care pathways for frailty and long-term conditions to proactively manage older people's health in the community
  • Continue to review and identify technology solutions that support older people and carer to optimise care at home, maintain activity and physical health, and minimise social isolation
  • Explore how community information hubs could support mild and moderate frail people/long-term conditions within general practice to prevent deterioration in health
  • Develop an approach to build community capacity and social prescribing across partner organisations, for example, peer support and volunteer programmes
  • Ensure that older people and their carers have access to the information they need, when they need it, and in an appropriate format

How will we know we have achieved this outcome?

  • Progress against the commissioning plans is monitored closely by individual planning and commissioning boards for each care group. The IJB's Strategic Planning Group has oversight of all of the plans and a 6 monthly progress report is made to the IJB
  • National Indicator 15 - Proportion of last 6 months of life spent at home or in a community setting
  • National Indicator 16 - Falls rate per 1,000 population aged 65+

 


The Equality Act 2010

The Equality Act 2010 stipulates that all public bodies across Scotland are required to produce and deliver a set of equality outcomes to further one or more of the three needs of the Public Sector Equality Duty (PSED/also known as General Duty).

The duty has two parts - a General Duty and Specific Duties. The General Duty came into force in April 2011 and applies to any organisation which carries out a public function.

There are a number of requirements under the Specific Duties which support public bodies to carry out the General Duty. The Scottish Government added Joint Integration Boards to Schedule 19 of the Equality Act 2010 and to The Equality Act 2010 (specific duties) Regulations 201 in April 2016 and so all IJBs are subject to the Specific Duties.

As such West Lothian Integration Joint Board has published a report on mainstreaming the equality duty including related equality outcomes.

 

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